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Multi Compressors Controller - SmartAir Master Compressed air management system

SmartAir Master
Compressed air management system

Superior control solution with great energy saving potential

Compressed air systems typically comprise of multiple compressors delivering air to a common distribution system. The combined capacity of those machines is generally greater than the maximum site demand.

With CompAir's advanced demand responsive sequencer SmartAir Master, the efficiency of compressor stations with up to twelve compressors including downstream equipment can be maximised. Apart from the energy savings, the compressed air management system also contributes to decreased downtime, optimum performance, service and monitoring and ultimately leads to increased plant productivity.

A profitable investment

Up to 35% energy savings can be achieved by implementing a central SmartAir Master multi-compressor controller.
  • Harmonises the workload of up to 12 fixed or regulated speed compressors
  • Eliminates energy waste by tightening the network pressure to the narrowest pressure band
  • Equalises the running hours for economic servicing and increased uptime

Versatile control functions

The SmartAir Master sequencer calculates the system demand and selects the most suitable compressor combination to meet exactly the plant requirements, which in turn offers significant energy savings.
Unlike conventional control systems, further equipment such as dryers, filters and condensate drains can be included, ensuring the complete compressed air system works at optimum performance.

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