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Did you buy the wrong type of compressed air dryer?

Do you have a desiccant compressed air dryer in your plant?
Yes?
Do you know the annual running cost of that dryer?
It's plugged into a power socked, so it probably uses a bit of electricity… and you need to replace the desiccant every so many years. Right?
True!
But for many types of desiccant air dryers, there's a hidden cost… and it is substantial!
In fact, the yearly cost will probably SHOCK you!
The culprit?
Purge air!
Purge air is air that is used to regenerate the desiccant. (the desiccant needs to be regenerated every few hours, to remove the water that it previously absorbed).
There are 2 main types of desiccant dryers:
Heated blower regenerated
This type uses an external blower and heater to regenerate the desiccant.

It requires only electricity (around 1 kW for every m3/min of compressed air).
Purge regenerated
This type doesn't use electricity to regenerate the desiccant...
Great, right! 
No! 
It uses precious compressed air!!!
This compressed air flow is between 10 and 20% of na…
4 Ways to Extend Your Air Compressor’s Life
Intelligent management of maintenance and operations of the plant’s compressed air system helps increase plant uptime, reduce unplanned shutdowns and help keep the plant profits and employee morale at peak levels. Service Agreement for Out-Sourced Compressor Maintenance With a full range of coverage options available, service provider inspects your air compressor for wear, damage and potential failure. Below are three different types of Air Compressor Service Agreements and their key benefits: OEM Service Schedules – Offer compressed air maintenance according to scheduled service intervals. Includes 46-point compressor inspection, filters and fluid.Annual Maintenance Agreement— Sakoon offers annual service agreements to relive plant managers from hassles of air compressor maintenance so that they may focus on production.Trouble Shoot Plan— System Failure – Call the Professionals! Should your system ever fail, customers can contact Sakoon spec…
Decoding the Duty Cycle Rating of Piston Compressors

Selecting the correct air compressor for your application can be a complicated process. Before making a purchase, operators need to specify the quality and amount of air their application requires. Each compressor technology (rotary, piston, centrifugal, etc.) has an optimal flow output, so users should choose compressor technology based on the compressed airflow requirement of their application. Some compressors, like rotary screw and centrifugal, are designed to run continuously at full speed while maintaining peak airflow (defined in cubic feet per minute, or CFM). The motors and cooling systems of these compressors are engineered to run 100 percent of the time without overheating. However, this isn’t true for all compressors. Piston compressors do not have the cooling capabilities to run continuously for extended periods of time. Therefore, each piston compressor must have a specified flow output and pressure, as well as the perc…
Splash and Pressure Lubrication in Piston Compressors
Piston compressors have been around for centuries. They can be either oil-injected or oil-free, depending on the application and end use. In oil-injected models, the oil typically serves three crucial purposes: cooling, sealing and lubricating. But not all oil-injected piston compressors lubricate components the same way. There are two common methods of lubricating the pump in piston compressors: splash and pressure lubrication.

Splash lubrication In splash lubrication, oil is applied to the cylinders and pistons by rotating dippers on the connecting-rod bearing caps. Each time they rotate, the dippers pass through an oil-filled trough. After running through the oil trough, the dippers splash oil onto the cylinders and pistons to lubricate them. While splash lubrication is effective for smaller engines and pumps, it’s not a precise process. Parts of the pump may be insufficiently oiled or oiled too much. The amount of oil in the trou…

Using Compressed Air? Think again!

Using Compressed Air? Think again!
We know this might sound strange from a guy who's all about compressed air... ... but did you ever wonder WHY and IF you really need to use compressed air? It might have been a very bad decision to make use of compressed air for your tools, machines, actuators, etc. Sure, some applications DEMAND compressed air. It's simply the only real option for it. And we know, compressed air and has many upsides: compressed air tools are very powerfulthey are safe to usecan operate in very dirty environmentsare cheaper compared to their electrical counterpartscan last a lifetime. I love all the benefits that using compressed air for your application brings.. but there is one very big downside..
Compressed air is EXPENSIVE.Very expensive.In fact, it's 7x - 8x more expensive compared to electricity. We talked about the cost of compressed air. And here's an example that shows exactly how and why using compressed air is 7x more expensive than electric…